It is amazing how quickly the world has changed! In preparing to re-open, we realize that the “new normal” may take much longer than we would have hoped.

At Alabama Hearing Associates, we are implementing best practice guidelines from the CDC, our national organizations, and professional associations. This means we will have to be slower, more deliberate, and thoughtful as we schedule you in the office.

We are calling to reschedule appointments in May and June to allow for disinfecting between patients. If you have not heard from us, please call 256-319-4327 today. For the foreseeable future, we will only be able to see you by appointment and without your family members in order to comply with social distancing guidelines.

If you have a problem with your hearing aid or need to purchase supplies, please call 256-319-4327 for instructions. Our staff is available to help in the Madison office Monday-Thursday, 8:00-4:30, and Friday, 8:00-noon. We appreciate your patience and understanding during these times of change.

Finally, a special word for our Huntsville patients. Our Balmoral Drive office is in a two-story building across the hall from a busy family practice medical clinic. For the safety of our patients and staff, we are still closed in the Huntsville office. Please know that we are closely monitoring the situation and will let you know when we feel it’s safe to return.

Please follow Alabama Hearing Associates on Facebook and please continue to check our website for updates.

Warm Regards,

Your Friends at Alabama Hearing Associates

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Dr. Jan Liles

Dr. Jan Liles

Dr. Liles earned her bachelor’s degree from the University of Montevallo and her master’s degree from the University of Alabama. From 1991 to 2001, she worked with two ENT medical practices and initiated one of the first newborn hearing screening programs in the state. In 2002, she was awarded a doctorate in audiology from the University of Florida. Dr. Liles and her longtime best friend, Dr. Sheehy, founded Alabama Hearing Associates in January 2002.
    Basic Hearing Test

    A basic hearing test begins with an air conduction test. You will be seated in a soundproof booth and single-use, foam earphones will be inserted into your ear canals. The Audiologist will ask you to push a button or raise your hand when you barely hear a series of beeps (tones) presented at various frequencies (pitches) to obtain your air conduction thresholds.

    To determine whether your hearing loss is a conductive (mechanical) loss, sensorineural (permanent) loss or combination of the two, we perform a bone conduction test.  

    For this test, a head band is place on the bone behind one of the ears to obtain your bone conduction thresholds. This process provides a different form of sound transmission using vibration, which bypasses the eardrum and the middle ear bones and directly stimulates the auditory nerve. When you hear the beeps/tones, you will push a button or raise your hand.

    If bone conduction thresholds are better than air conduction thresholds (through the foam inserts), you have a conductive hearing loss. This suggests a problem with the mechanical structures (moving parts) of the ears.

    Conductive hearing loss is often a medically treatable condition for which we will provide you with a referral to an Ear, Nose and Throat (ENT) physician. However, if bone and air conduction thresholds match, it indicates a sensorineural hearing loss (permanent), and the treatment will likely involve hearing aids.