Cochlear Implants in Alabama

Engage In Conversation More Easily And Experience An Array Of Sounds That You Were Otherwise Unaware Of

If you or a loved one are struggling with your hearing and you’re exploring your options, then you may have heard of Cochlear Implants.

But with so many myths and misconceptions, many people get confused between what is fact and what is fiction.

Our job is to help demystify the options available to you, and help you to take your first step towards better hearing.

What are Cochlear Implants?

A cochlear implant is an electronic device that is implanted into the cochlear, the snail-shaped part of the inner ear. It turns sound into electronic signals and compensates for the damaged structure of the inner ear, restoring sound for the wearer.

While it is most useful in translating conversation, it also helps to regulate the sound of your own natural speaking voice, so it doesn’t sound overpowering for the user.

Cochlear implants can be placed in one ear for unilateral hearing loss, or both ears for bilateral hearing loss, and are used on both adults and children, with users experiencing an overall richer sound quality.

 

 

Call Us At (256) 319 4327 For Madison, (256) 489 0903 For Huntsville OR Complete The Form On This Page To Arrange A Demonstration

How Do They Work?

  • Sound is picked up by the microphone worn on/near the external processor.
  • This sound is processed into electrical signals and passed to a transmitter coil that is worn on the head.
  • The signals are sent by radio waves, through the skin to the implanted receiver, and down the wire to the electrode in the cochlear.
  • When the electrode receives the signal, it produces a current that travels along the auditory nerve, which produces the sensation of hearing.

Above all, cochlear implants help to clarify sounds for the user, allowing them to engage in conversation easier and witness an array of sounds that they were otherwise unaware of.

Schedule a Demonstration

Our team of specialists is happy to demonstrate a cochlear implant at any of our locations

If you’d like to learn more about cochlear implants and our Best Practices, simply complete this form and we’ll get back to you shortly.

 

 

Had another visit with Dr. Jan today and as usual, all went well. She is an amazing person. My hearing is almost normal again thanks to her skills and advice. I highly recommend ABA to anyone with hearing problems.
Ray W.

Great folks at Alabama Hearing Associates! Dr. Susan has been wonderful to work with. Professional all the way. The follow ups and expertise is genuine. If you suffer with hearing loss, this is the place to go.

Russ W.

Basic Hearing Test

A basic hearing test begins with an air conduction test. You will be seated in a soundproof booth and single-use, foam earphones will be inserted into your ear canals. The Audiologist will ask you to push a button or raise your hand when you barely hear a series of beeps (tones) presented at various frequencies (pitches) to obtain your air conduction thresholds.

To determine whether your hearing loss is a conductive (mechanical) loss, sensorineural (permanent) loss or combination of the two, we perform a bone conduction test.  

For this test, a head band is place on the bone behind one of the ears to obtain your bone conduction thresholds. This process provides a different form of sound transmission using vibration, which bypasses the eardrum and the middle ear bones and directly stimulates the auditory nerve. When you hear the beeps/tones, you will push a button or raise your hand.

If bone conduction thresholds are better than air conduction thresholds (through the foam inserts), you have a conductive hearing loss. This suggests a problem with the mechanical structures (moving parts) of the ears.

Conductive hearing loss is often a medically treatable condition for which we will provide you with a referral to an Ear, Nose and Throat (ENT) physician. However, if bone and air conduction thresholds match, it indicates a sensorineural hearing loss (permanent), and the treatment will likely involve hearing aids.