With ongoing technological advancements, audiologists are discovering new ways to captivate and address hearing loss issues.

In fact, even a simple upgrade to your device can see a significant advancement in your hearing.

However, with all the conflicting information available on the internet, it can be difficult to know the correct steps to take, such as when to upgrade your hearing aids.

How Long Do Hearing Aids Last?

On average, hearing aids last between 4-6 years. However, this figure is different from person-to-person and is dependent on their level of maintenance and the device fitted.

If properly maintained and looked after, many people get as long as 10 years before upgrading!

Many factors may contribute towards someone upgrading their device, but the main reasons are changes to a person’s hearing or new technology.

With the rate that technology is advancing, hearing care progresses faster than ever before, meaning a new upgrade will be extremely beneficial.

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When Is The Right Time To Upgrade?

Upgrading to new hearing aid technology is most dependent on the severity of a person’s hearing loss.

The greater the amount and severity of hearing loss, the more benefit will be realized from new technology.

Hearing aids are not just speaker systems; they are a medical aid for many people, allowing them to live a fulfilled life.

Hearing aid technology caters to all individuals, using expert technology to assist people daily. Functions such as improved speech in noise filtering and speech enhancement are a lifesaver for many people.

Each individual’s hearing journey is personal to themselves, meaning you decide when to upgrade. At Alabama Hearing Associates, we will always advise on the correct steps to take.

If you or a loved one is ready to upgrade your devices, or want advice on your options, contact our friendly team to see how we can help support you in your next steps to better hearing.

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Dr. Jan Liles

Dr. Jan Liles

Dr. Liles earned her bachelor’s degree from the University of Montevallo and her master’s degree from the University of Alabama. From 1991 to 2001, she worked with two ENT medical practices and initiated one of the first newborn hearing screening programs in the state. In 2002, she was awarded a doctorate in audiology from the University of Florida. Dr. Liles and her longtime best friend, Dr. Sheehy, founded Alabama Hearing Associates in January 2002.
    Basic Hearing Test

    A basic hearing test begins with an air conduction test. You will be seated in a soundproof booth and single-use, foam earphones will be inserted into your ear canals. The Audiologist will ask you to push a button or raise your hand when you barely hear a series of beeps (tones) presented at various frequencies (pitches) to obtain your air conduction thresholds.

    To determine whether your hearing loss is a conductive (mechanical) loss, sensorineural (permanent) loss or combination of the two, we perform a bone conduction test.  

    For this test, a head band is place on the bone behind one of the ears to obtain your bone conduction thresholds. This process provides a different form of sound transmission using vibration, which bypasses the eardrum and the middle ear bones and directly stimulates the auditory nerve. When you hear the beeps/tones, you will push a button or raise your hand.

    If bone conduction thresholds are better than air conduction thresholds (through the foam inserts), you have a conductive hearing loss. This suggests a problem with the mechanical structures (moving parts) of the ears.

    Conductive hearing loss is often a medically treatable condition for which we will provide you with a referral to an Ear, Nose and Throat (ENT) physician. However, if bone and air conduction thresholds match, it indicates a sensorineural hearing loss (permanent), and the treatment will likely involve hearing aids.