Patient Resources

Can You Have Hearing Loss in One Ear?

Can You Have Hearing Loss in One Ear?

It's unconventional, but I'm going to start our discussion by answering the title question. Can you have hearing loss in one ear? The simple answer is yes. Note: Sudden hearing loss in one ear is an urgent health issue...

COVID-19 Announcement – April 24, 2020 Update

COVID-19 Announcement – April 24, 2020 Update

It is amazing how quickly the world has changed! In preparing to re-open, we realize that the “new normal” may take much longer than we would have hoped. At Alabama Hearing Associates, we are implementing best practice...

Covid-19 Update

Covid-19 Update

As you may know, Governor Ivey enacted a closure of nonessential business from March 27 through April 17. Our President has already urged Americans to continue distancing themselves 6 ft from others through April 30,...

Troubleshooting Common Hearing Aid Problems

Troubleshooting Common Hearing Aid Problems

In most cases, hearing aids are essential for reconnecting my patients to the world of sound. Not only can they hear better, but their quality of life is also improved. Nevertheless, there is an adjustment period...

Two Different Types of Hearing Loss

Two Different Types of Hearing Loss

As a doctor of audiology, an integral part of my practice includes identifying different types of hearing loss and their causes through various assessments and examinations. Once I have identified the type and cause, I...

What is Conductive Hearing Loss?

What is Conductive Hearing Loss?

How the ears operate is a miracle of design, and their role in keeping us connected and informed about the world around us is admirable. However, diminished hearing capacity causes frustration and becomes burdensome....

How Do I Know if I Need a Hearing Test?

How Do I Know if I Need a Hearing Test?

Hearing loss has a tendency to creep up on you. Most people are unaware that they have any kind of problem until they have an advanced condition or a loved one insists on a hearing test. Early detection of hearing loss...

Request a Callback

It’s often the small things that hold us back from making a decision, whether it’s an unknown or a question. That’s why our AudCouple, Dr. Jan and Dr. Susan, is on hand to help.

Basic Hearing Test

A basic hearing test begins with an air conduction test. You will be seated in a soundproof booth and single-use, foam earphones will be inserted into your ear canals. The Audiologist will ask you to push a button or raise your hand when you barely hear a series of beeps (tones) presented at various frequencies (pitches) to obtain your air conduction thresholds.

To determine whether your hearing loss is a conductive (mechanical) loss, sensorineural (permanent) loss or combination of the two, we perform a bone conduction test.  

For this test, a head band is place on the bone behind one of the ears to obtain your bone conduction thresholds. This process provides a different form of sound transmission using vibration, which bypasses the eardrum and the middle ear bones and directly stimulates the auditory nerve. When you hear the beeps/tones, you will push a button or raise your hand.

If bone conduction thresholds are better than air conduction thresholds (through the foam inserts), you have a conductive hearing loss. This suggests a problem with the mechanical structures (moving parts) of the ears.

Conductive hearing loss is often a medically treatable condition for which we will provide you with a referral to an Ear, Nose and Throat (ENT) physician. However, if bone and air conduction thresholds match, it indicates a sensorineural hearing loss (permanent), and the treatment will likely involve hearing aids.