The Amazing Truth About Earwax

The Amazing Truth About Earwax

Let’s face it: earwax (also known as cerumen) is often considered the dirty, smelly part of audiology. In over twenty-nine years of treating patients, I have been amazed at how the presence of earwax horrifies my patients. They often go to great extremes to clean...
After 16 years, we say, ‘Thank you, Pam!’

After 16 years, we say, ‘Thank you, Pam!’

Jan and I planted the seeds of Alabama Hearing Associates almost 20 years ago. But there has been someone who has nurtured the office right alongside us. That person has been Pam Moore Chambers, our fantastic office manager. Pam took care of everyone who stepped...
What Are the Links Between COVID-19 And Sudden Hearing Loss?

What Are the Links Between COVID-19 And Sudden Hearing Loss?

COVID-19 is known to produce a variety of health issues. But new research has revealed that it may also damage our hearing. Experts from the University College London (UK) have linked the virus to sudden sensorineural hearing loss – where a person rapidly loses their...

September News | Testing, testing…

Hello there! Hearing aid technology has come a long way in the last twenty years, making patients’ lives better and brighter than ever before. It keeps people with a hearing loss connected to the world and means everyday life is less challenging. One of our patients...

August News | It’s all about you!

Hello there! These last few months have been difficult for everyone, especially for those with a hearing loss. For many, communication has proven challenging due to face masks, making lip reading impossible. This has put some folks in a difficult situation as they...
Basic Hearing Test

A basic hearing test begins with an air conduction test. You will be seated in a soundproof booth and single-use, foam earphones will be inserted into your ear canals. The Audiologist will ask you to push a button or raise your hand when you barely hear a series of beeps (tones) presented at various frequencies (pitches) to obtain your air conduction thresholds.

To determine whether your hearing loss is a conductive (mechanical) loss, sensorineural (permanent) loss or combination of the two, we perform a bone conduction test.  

For this test, a head band is place on the bone behind one of the ears to obtain your bone conduction thresholds. This process provides a different form of sound transmission using vibration, which bypasses the eardrum and the middle ear bones and directly stimulates the auditory nerve. When you hear the beeps/tones, you will push a button or raise your hand.

If bone conduction thresholds are better than air conduction thresholds (through the foam inserts), you have a conductive hearing loss. This suggests a problem with the mechanical structures (moving parts) of the ears.

Conductive hearing loss is often a medically treatable condition for which we will provide you with a referral to an Ear, Nose and Throat (ENT) physician. However, if bone and air conduction thresholds match, it indicates a sensorineural hearing loss (permanent), and the treatment will likely involve hearing aids.