Patient Resources

What Is Electroacoustic Analysis? (EAA)

What Is Electroacoustic Analysis? (EAA)

How do I know my hearing aids are working like they should?   Over the past year, the hearing instrument test box has quickly become one of my most-used pieces of equipment. Electroacoustic analysis (EAA) is a...

What Are Locked Hearing Aids?

What Are Locked Hearing Aids?

What are locked hearing aids?  Locked hearing aids are essentially store-brand versions of name-brand hearing aids. While that may not sound like a bad thing, as store brands are often the same thing at a less...

Understanding Your Hearing Test

Understanding Your Hearing Test

What happens during a basic hearing test?  You will be seated in a soundproof booth, and single-use foam earphones will be inserted into your ear canals. One of our audiologists will ask you to push a button or raise...

What Is Real-Ear Measurement?

What Is Real-Ear Measurement?

Real-ear measurement (REM) is how an audiologist knows that hearing aids are working the way they should in each patient's ears. Ears are as unique as a fingerprint. Because of this, every ear will collect sounds...

Our Continued Care & Coverage Plan 

Our Continued Care & Coverage Plan 

Do I need to come back after my hearing aids are fit? Hearing aids are not a quick fix, and better hearing is truly a journey. Whether it is reprogramming, hearing aid cleaning, or even Bluetooth troubleshooting,...

What Is The Redux System?

What Is The Redux System?

Did you know that your ear canal is as humid as the Amazon Rainforest? Hearing aids are built to be worn 10+ hours a day, 7 days a week, in varying levels of humidity and heat—for years! When I think about everything a...

How Do I Know When to Upgrade My Hearing Aids?

How Do I Know When to Upgrade My Hearing Aids?

With ongoing technological advancements, audiologists are discovering new ways to captivate and address hearing loss issues. In fact, even a simple upgrade to your device can see a significant advancement in your...

How to Adjust to New Hearing Aids

How to Adjust to New Hearing Aids

Educating new hearing aid users is a big part of what I do as a Doctor of Audiology at Alabama Hearing Associates. New users frequently have a bit of anxiety about starting to wear hearing aids. To prepare our new...

COVID 19 Update

COVID 19 Update

It's the New Year and time for a new Covid 19 update from Alabama Hearing Associates. Over the past year, we've lost patients, friends and family members to Covid. Like millions of others around the world, we've...

Basic Hearing Test

A basic hearing test begins with an air conduction test. You will be seated in a soundproof booth and single-use, foam earphones will be inserted into your ear canals. The Audiologist will ask you to push a button or raise your hand when you barely hear a series of beeps (tones) presented at various frequencies (pitches) to obtain your air conduction thresholds.

To determine whether your hearing loss is a conductive (mechanical) loss, sensorineural (permanent) loss or combination of the two, we perform a bone conduction test.  

For this test, a head band is place on the bone behind one of the ears to obtain your bone conduction thresholds. This process provides a different form of sound transmission using vibration, which bypasses the eardrum and the middle ear bones and directly stimulates the auditory nerve. When you hear the beeps/tones, you will push a button or raise your hand.

If bone conduction thresholds are better than air conduction thresholds (through the foam inserts), you have a conductive hearing loss. This suggests a problem with the mechanical structures (moving parts) of the ears.

Conductive hearing loss is often a medically treatable condition for which we will provide you with a referral to an Ear, Nose and Throat (ENT) physician. However, if bone and air conduction thresholds match, it indicates a sensorineural hearing loss (permanent), and the treatment will likely involve hearing aids.